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Podcasts



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One to One

Gospel and social change: Gillian Burke and Karen Gibson (6 days old [20/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this third programme Gillian speaks to the conductor of The Kingdom Choir, Karen Gibson. Karen grew up singing in church and Gospel groups, before graduating to the role of choir conductor on a BBC radio programme called The Gospel Train. She was asked to perform on the 35th anniversary of 'Songs of Praise', and The Kingdom Choir was born. In 2018 they stepped onto the [...]

Gospel in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Richard Penrose (13 days old [13/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this second programme Gillian delves deeper into the mechanics of gospel music and asks Musical Director Richard Penrose exactly what makes a Gospel song. They discuss Richard's own route into Gospel music which began when he was a teenager in his home town of Porthleven. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field

Gospel music in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Ley Adewole (20 days old [06/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. Ley Adewole is the Director of the Falmouth Community Gospel Choir. Ley began singing in a Pentecostal church in Coventry; she joined various singing groups, got spotted and went on to do session work. She relocated to Falmouth and set-up a gospel music workshop to fill-in the winter months. The choir was born, welcoming in people of all faiths, and even those who can and[...]

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (90 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (97 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Dr Margee Kerr (104 days old [14/06/22])

audioBefore her life as a financial journalist began, Felicity Hannah could more often be found wearing a top hat, leading tourists round the ghostly streets beneath Edinburgh. She loves sudden startles and that sense of creeping enjoyable fear in person, in books and on screen, but she wants to know why. Why are some humans wired to get a thrill out of fear? Why not all of us? Felicity talks to fear expert Dr Margee Kerr, sociologist and author of Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, about what happens in our bodies when we’re frightened, and how, surprisingly, this can help us bui[...]

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Neil Gaiman (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioSpooky tour guide turned financial journalist Felicity Hannah wants to know why being scared can feel so good. Why do we frighten ourselves for fun? Why do we love scary stories and terrifying TV? She asks Neil Gaiman, author of Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Neverwhere and The Sandman – a storyteller who knows all about the power of fear to fascinate and delight us. Felicity and Neil talk about what scares them the most, when fear loses its thrill, and, of course, ‘horror for four year olds’. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Dr Martha Newson (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to anthropologist Dr Martha Newson, who has studied rave, about about why humans have always partied, how it can bond us, and whether rave can change society for the better. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Eris Drew (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to DJ Eris Drew about how rave culture triggered massive changes in each of their lives. For Faranak, it meant rebelling against the strict culture of her home country of Iran, and finding a new life elsewhere. And for Eris, it meant even more profound questions about identity. But what is it about the "motherbeat", as Eris calls it, that makes it so powerful? Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis meets Vee Kativhu (335 days old [26/10/21])

audioVee Kativhu has a kind of fame incomprehensible to most people aged over 40. She makes videos in which she struggles with essay deadlines, gives study tips and celebrates getting the keys to her first flat. Tens of thousands of people watch each vlog she posts, so with so much of her life public, how does she maintain her privacy? Producer Sally Heaven

(C) BBC 2022

One to One

Gospel and social change: Gillian Burke and Karen Gibson (6 days old [20/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this third programme Gillian speaks to the conductor of The Kingdom Choir, Karen Gibson. Karen grew up singing in church and Gospel groups, before graduating to the role of choir conductor on a BBC radio programme called The Gospel Train. She was asked to perform on the 35th anniversary of 'Songs of Praise', and The Kingdom Choir was born. In 2018 they stepped onto the [...]

Gospel in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Richard Penrose (13 days old [13/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this second programme Gillian delves deeper into the mechanics of gospel music and asks Musical Director Richard Penrose exactly what makes a Gospel song. They discuss Richard's own route into Gospel music which began when he was a teenager in his home town of Porthleven. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field

Gospel music in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Ley Adewole (20 days old [06/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. Ley Adewole is the Director of the Falmouth Community Gospel Choir. Ley began singing in a Pentecostal church in Coventry; she joined various singing groups, got spotted and went on to do session work. She relocated to Falmouth and set-up a gospel music workshop to fill-in the winter months. The choir was born, welcoming in people of all faiths, and even those who can and[...]

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (90 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (97 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Dr Margee Kerr (104 days old [14/06/22])

audioBefore her life as a financial journalist began, Felicity Hannah could more often be found wearing a top hat, leading tourists round the ghostly streets beneath Edinburgh. She loves sudden startles and that sense of creeping enjoyable fear in person, in books and on screen, but she wants to know why. Why are some humans wired to get a thrill out of fear? Why not all of us? Felicity talks to fear expert Dr Margee Kerr, sociologist and author of Scream: Chilling Adventures in the Science of Fear, about what happens in our bodies when we’re frightened, and how, surprisingly, this can help us bui[...]

The Thrill of Fear: Felicity Hannah talks to Neil Gaiman (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioSpooky tour guide turned financial journalist Felicity Hannah wants to know why being scared can feel so good. Why do we frighten ourselves for fun? Why do we love scary stories and terrifying TV? She asks Neil Gaiman, author of Coraline, The Graveyard Book, Neverwhere and The Sandman – a storyteller who knows all about the power of fear to fascinate and delight us. Felicity and Neil talk about what scares them the most, when fear loses its thrill, and, of course, ‘horror for four year olds’. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Sarah Goodman.

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Dr Martha Newson (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to anthropologist Dr Martha Newson, who has studied rave, about about why humans have always partied, how it can bond us, and whether rave can change society for the better. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

The Beat of Change: Faranak Amidi and Eris Drew (108 days old [10/06/22])

audioFaranak Amidi, World Service radio presenter and women's affairs reporter, talks to DJ Eris Drew about how rave culture triggered massive changes in each of their lives. For Faranak, it meant rebelling against the strict culture of her home country of Iran, and finding a new life elsewhere. And for Eris, it meant even more profound questions about identity. But what is it about the "motherbeat", as Eris calls it, that makes it so powerful? Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Faces of Fame: Janet Ellis meets Vee Kativhu (335 days old [26/10/21])

audioVee Kativhu has a kind of fame incomprehensible to most people aged over 40. She makes videos in which she struggles with essay deadlines, gives study tips and celebrates getting the keys to her first flat. Tens of thousands of people watch each vlog she posts, so with so much of her life public, how does she maintain her privacy? Producer Sally Heaven

(C) BBC 2022

The Life Scientific

Emily Holmes on how to treat trauma (6 days old [20/09/22])

audioEmily Holmes is a distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychology at Uppsala University and a neuroscientist who struggled to learn to read and write as a child. She tells Jim Al-Khalili about her work as a mental health scientist and her life-long love of art and explains why the images we see in our mind’s eye have more of an impact on our emotions than their verbal counterpart. And describes how this fundamental insight led her to develop a simple and cost-effective treatment for the fleeting flashbacks that haunt people with post traumatic stress disorder: briefly recalling the traumatic e[...]

Judith Bunbury on the shifting River Nile in the time of the Pharaohs (12 days old [14/09/22])

audioThink Sahara Desert, think intense heat and drought. We see the Sahara as an unrelenting, frazzling, white place. But geo-archaeologist Dr Judith Bunbury says in the not so distant past, the region looked more like a safari park. In the more recent New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, from around 3.5 thousand years ago (the time of some of Egypt’s most famous kings like Ahmose I, Thutmose III, Akhenaten, Tutankhamun and queens like Hatshepsut) evidence from core samples shows evidence of rainfall, huge lakes, springs, trees, birds, hares and even gazelle, very different from today. By combining geo[...]

Frances Arnold: From taxi driver to Nobel Prize (20 days old [06/09/22])

audioNobel Prize-winning chemist Frances Arnold left home at 15 and went to school ‘only when she felt like it’. She disagreed with her parents about the Vietnam War and drove big yellow taxis in Pittsburgh to pay the rent. Decades later, after several changes of direction (from aerospace engineer to biotech pioneer), she invented a radical new approach to engineering enzymes. Rather than try to design industrial enzymes from scratch (which she considered to be an impossible task), Frances decided to let Nature do the work. ‘I breed enzymes like other people breed cats and dogs’ she says. Whi[...]

Sir Martin Landray on saving over a million lives (90 days old [28/06/22])

audioWho could forget the beginning of 2020, when a ‘mysterious viral pneumonia’ emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. Soon, other countries were affected and deaths around the world began to climb. Perhaps most alarmingly of all, there were no proven treatments to help prevent those deaths. As the World Health Organisation declared the Covid-19 outbreak a pandemic, and the UK and the rest of the world braced itself for what was to come, doctor and drug-trial designer Martin Landray had his mind on a solution, devising the protocol, or blueprint, for the world’s largest drug trial for Covid-19. [...]

Vlatko Vedral on the universe as quantum information (97 days old [21/06/22])

audioVlatko Vedral describes himself as a quantum information practitioner, who believes that our universe is made up of quantum bits of information. It is information, he tells Professor Jim Al-Khalili, rather than energy or matter, the traditional building blocks of classical Newtonian physics, that can help us to understand the nature of reality. Vlatko is Professor of Quantum Information Science at the University of Oxford and the Principal Investigator at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and he talks to Jim in front of an audience at the Cheltenha[...]

Adam Hart on ants, bees and insect burgers (104 days old [14/06/22])

audioAnt-loving professor, Adam Hart, shares his passion for leaf cutting ants with Jim Al Khalili. Why do they put leaves in piles for other ants to pick up? Talking at the Hay Festival, Adam describes the experiments he designed to test the intelligence of the hive mind. When does a waggle dance become a tremble dance? And how do the honey bees know when this moment should be? We like the phrase ‘as busy as a bee’. In fact, bees spend a lot of time doing nothing at all, a sensible strategy from the point of view of natural selection. And where does Adam stand on insect burgers? P[...]

Jacinta Tan on anorexia nervosa and the mind (111 days old [07/06/22])

audioWhen a person with severe anorexia nervosa refuses food, the very treatment they need to survive, is that refusal carefully considered and rational, as it can appear to those around them? Or is it really the illness that’s causing them to say ‘no’? This is one of the thorny ethical dilemmas that Jacinta Tan has wrestled with over the course of her career. She is deeply curious about the mind, and has spent hundreds of hours sitting with people with anorexia nervosa, not persuading them to eat, rather listening to them talk about what’s going on in their minds and how the illness influence[...]

Pete Smith on why soil matters (118 days old [31/05/22])

audioPete Smith is very down to earth. Not least because he’s interested in soil and the vital role it plays in helping us to feed the world, mitigate climate change and maintain a rich diversity of species on planet earth. He was born in a pub and failed the 11+ exam (designed to identify bright children just like him) but he became a distinguished professor nonetheless. Tackling climate change in isolation is a mistake, he says. We need to consider all the challenges facing humanity and identify strategies that deliver benefits on all fronts: food security, bio-diversity and human development [...]

Chi Onwurah on why engineering is a caring profession. (125 days old [24/05/22])

audioChi Onwurah tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to become a telecoms engineer and why engineering is a caring profession. As a black, working class woman from a council estate in Newcastle, she was in a minority of one studying engineering at university in London and encountered terrible racism and sexism. She went on to build digital networks all over the world, the networks that make today's instant multimedia communications possible. And Chi built the first mobile phone network in Nigeria, when the country was without a reliable electricity supply. Today she is Shadow Minister for Scienc[...]

Ailie MacAdam on the biggest construction project in Europe (181 days old [29/03/22])

audioAilie's first engineering challenge was working out how to get the solids to settle in a mixture of raw sewage at a treatment plant in Stuttgart. Years later, she worked on the Boston Big Dig and realised that large-scale construction projects were her thing. A seven lane highway was rerouted underground and a bridge built using blocks of expanded polystyrene to support the on off ramps. When Bostonians complained about the vibrations from all the drilling, their beds were put on springs. She returned home to the UK to run the transformation of St Pancras Station in London, creating an interna[...]

(C) BBC 2022

Ipswich