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Podcasts



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One to One

Lynne Truss on travel: Walk or Pilgrimage? (18 days old [27/11/18])

audioIn the last of three programmes exploring our experiences of travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons, co-founder of the British Pilgrimage Trust on a short pilgrimage along the Old Way in East Sussex. They begin under the ancient Yew tree in Mary and St Peter’s Church in Wilmington and walk via the Long Man and Saint Peter of Vincula in Folkington to St Andrews’ Church in Jevington. The journey offers Lynne a chance to discover what a pilgrimage is and how it differs from a walk. Aided by her pilgrim’s staff it proves to be a journey of unexpected encounters and experiences for[...]

Lynne Truss on travel: A year in a camper-van (25 days old [20/11/18])

audioLynne Truss talks to Jillian Moody about her experiences of travelling across the world in a campervan with her husband and three young daughters. The family bought a second-hand campervan prior to the trip which had no shower and no toilet and after a terrible first night, reality took its toll as they realised their itinerary would have to change. They were faced with many challenges en route but after 38,000 miles, there's no doubt it was a life-changing experience for Jillian. Producer Sarah Bunt.

Soumaya Keynes meets Stephen Machin (28 days old [16/11/18])

audioThe Economist's Soumaya Keynes continues her quest to find out why the study of economics is so dominated by men. Does that affect the kind of economics we get, and why does that matter? In her second programme, Soumaya meets Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, who thinks it's a problem some in his profession are failing to recognize. Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Lynne Truss on travel: Is it worth it? (32 days old [13/11/18])

audioWhen it comes to travel is the expectation greater than the realisation? Lynne Truss has been a writer for over 25 years and without making it a conscious ambition she has travelled to a huge number of destinations. But if you ask her if she likes travelling, she will say "Absolutely not, I hate it. I find its utterly stressful." This has made her curious as to why we travel. In an age when we have access to the world at the click of a button on the internet or the TV, why do we still want to physically go somewhere else? What do we hope to get out of the experience? Is the hassle of delaye[...]

Inheritance: Give it up or pass it on? (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioBronwen Maddox meets the environmentalist Tom Burke, who plans to pass on the majority of his legacy to his passion: supporting bird life. Tom was brought up on a council estate in Plymouth, and didn't inherit any money from his parents. He says hard work, luck and the property price boom have given him a substantial amount to pass on. But he believes leaving too much money to younger family members is the wrong thing to do - and he doesn't want it to go to the state. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Inheritance: When It Gets Complicated (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioBronwen Maddox talks to Lancaster solicitor and stepfather Gary Rycroft about solving disputes. Our family structures are getting more and more complicated, we're getting more and more demanding, so how can we avoid inheritance disputes? He talks about what writing wills in his professional life has led him to do in his own personal family life. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Inheritance: Who Gets the Farm? (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioWho gets the farm? Bronwen Maddox goes to Wicton Farm in Herefordshire to meet Claire Howlett. Claire runs the farm with her brother Daniel, while her parents still live in the farmhouse. Succession is a big issue in farming, and Claire explains how she and her family handled the difficulties of passing on the management of this farm from one generation to the next. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Soumaya Keynes meets Beatrice Cherrier (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioThe story of women's under-representation in economics: from the 1920s to #MeToo - how much progress has there really been in the last 100 years? The Economist's Soumaya Keynes talks to Beatrice Cherrier from the French National Centre for Scientific Research, who writes, blogs and tweets on the history of economics studies. Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Soumaya Keynes meets Claudia Goldin (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioDoes economics have a problem with women? The Economist's Soumaya Keynes shares experiences with Harvard's Claudia Goldin, a former president of the American Economic Association.

Coming Back From the Brink (39 days old [05/11/18])

audioCommunity Radio Awards 2016 Female Presenter of the Year, Primrose Granville talks to the Jamaican chef Henroy Brown about his near death experience as a young man in his twenties, when he was diagnosed first with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, and then with the near fatal Steven Johnson syndrome. She herself came through a very traumatic point in her own life. In 2003 she was an Early Years/Special Needs practitioner with dreams of becoming a Head Teacher, married with a young son. A freak incident ended all that. Within 18 months she was unemployed, unemployable, separated and with no financial se[...]

(C) BBC 2018

One to One

Lynne Truss on travel: Walk or Pilgrimage? (18 days old [27/11/18])

audioIn the last of three programmes exploring our experiences of travel and why we do it, Lynne Truss joins Will Parsons, co-founder of the British Pilgrimage Trust on a short pilgrimage along the Old Way in East Sussex. They begin under the ancient Yew tree in Mary and St Peter’s Church in Wilmington and walk via the Long Man and Saint Peter of Vincula in Folkington to St Andrews’ Church in Jevington. The journey offers Lynne a chance to discover what a pilgrimage is and how it differs from a walk. Aided by her pilgrim’s staff it proves to be a journey of unexpected encounters and experiences for[...]

Lynne Truss on travel: A year in a camper-van (25 days old [20/11/18])

audioLynne Truss talks to Jillian Moody about her experiences of travelling across the world in a campervan with her husband and three young daughters. The family bought a second-hand campervan prior to the trip which had no shower and no toilet and after a terrible first night, reality took its toll as they realised their itinerary would have to change. They were faced with many challenges en route but after 38,000 miles, there's no doubt it was a life-changing experience for Jillian. Producer Sarah Bunt.

Soumaya Keynes meets Stephen Machin (28 days old [16/11/18])

audioThe Economist's Soumaya Keynes continues her quest to find out why the study of economics is so dominated by men. Does that affect the kind of economics we get, and why does that matter? In her second programme, Soumaya meets Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, who thinks it's a problem some in his profession are failing to recognize. Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Lynne Truss on travel: Is it worth it? (32 days old [13/11/18])

audioWhen it comes to travel is the expectation greater than the realisation? Lynne Truss has been a writer for over 25 years and without making it a conscious ambition she has travelled to a huge number of destinations. But if you ask her if she likes travelling, she will say "Absolutely not, I hate it. I find its utterly stressful." This has made her curious as to why we travel. In an age when we have access to the world at the click of a button on the internet or the TV, why do we still want to physically go somewhere else? What do we hope to get out of the experience? Is the hassle of delaye[...]

Inheritance: Give it up or pass it on? (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioBronwen Maddox meets the environmentalist Tom Burke, who plans to pass on the majority of his legacy to his passion: supporting bird life. Tom was brought up on a council estate in Plymouth, and didn't inherit any money from his parents. He says hard work, luck and the property price boom have given him a substantial amount to pass on. But he believes leaving too much money to younger family members is the wrong thing to do - and he doesn't want it to go to the state. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Inheritance: When It Gets Complicated (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioBronwen Maddox talks to Lancaster solicitor and stepfather Gary Rycroft about solving disputes. Our family structures are getting more and more complicated, we're getting more and more demanding, so how can we avoid inheritance disputes? He talks about what writing wills in his professional life has led him to do in his own personal family life. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Inheritance: Who Gets the Farm? (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioWho gets the farm? Bronwen Maddox goes to Wicton Farm in Herefordshire to meet Claire Howlett. Claire runs the farm with her brother Daniel, while her parents still live in the farmhouse. Succession is a big issue in farming, and Claire explains how she and her family handled the difficulties of passing on the management of this farm from one generation to the next. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Soumaya Keynes meets Beatrice Cherrier (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioThe story of women's under-representation in economics: from the 1920s to #MeToo - how much progress has there really been in the last 100 years? The Economist's Soumaya Keynes talks to Beatrice Cherrier from the French National Centre for Scientific Research, who writes, blogs and tweets on the history of economics studies. Producer: Chris Ledgard.

Soumaya Keynes meets Claudia Goldin (35 days old [09/11/18])

audioDoes economics have a problem with women? The Economist's Soumaya Keynes shares experiences with Harvard's Claudia Goldin, a former president of the American Economic Association.

Coming Back From the Brink (39 days old [05/11/18])

audioCommunity Radio Awards 2016 Female Presenter of the Year, Primrose Granville talks to the Jamaican chef Henroy Brown about his near death experience as a young man in his twenties, when he was diagnosed first with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, and then with the near fatal Steven Johnson syndrome. She herself came through a very traumatic point in her own life. In 2003 she was an Early Years/Special Needs practitioner with dreams of becoming a Head Teacher, married with a young son. A freak incident ended all that. Within 18 months she was unemployed, unemployable, separated and with no financial se[...]

(C) BBC 2018

The Life Scientific

Clive Oppenheimer on the volcanic offerings of our angry earth (4 days old [11/12/18])

audioClive Oppenheimer has, more than once, been threatened with guns (a Life Scientific first?). He's dodged and ducked lava bombs and he's risked instant death in scorching and explosive eruptions. He studies volcanoes; science that by necessity, requires his presence at the volcanic hotspots of the world. It was at the lip of a bubbling lava crater on one of the earth's most active volcanoes, Mount Erebus in Antarctica, that he met the film and documentary maker Werner Herzog. The two became friends and went on to make a volcano movie together. Clive, who's Professor of Volcanology at the Unive[...]

Sky at Night presenter Maggie Aderin-Pocock (11 days old [04/12/18])

audioMaggie Aderin-Pocock has been fascinated by space since she was a young child. When she was six years old she caught the bug when she saw a picture of an astronaut on the front of a book in her primary school library. As a teenager she built her own telescope. After studying physics and mechanical engineering, Maggie worked in industrial research before returning to her first love, astronomy, when she managed the building of an instrument on a giant telescope in Chile. Now, she spends her time presenting TV programmes, in particular the BBC’s Sky at Night, and inspiring the next generation [...]

Banning chemical weapons with Alastair Hay (17 days old [27/11/18])

audioAlastair Hay, now Emeritus Professor of Environmental Toxicology at the University of Leeds, is a chemist who’s had a dual career as an academic researcher and an outspoken activist and campaigner. The common theme has been the application of his knowledge to how chemicals affect our lives, in the workplace and during conflicts. Alastair Hay is best known for his work to rid the world of chemical weapons, a concern about this horrific form of warfare that goes back to the use of Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. His work culminated in the Chemical Weapons Convention, which came into force in [...]

Formula One engineer Caroline Hargrove (25 days old [20/11/18])

audioHow do you convince Formula One racing drivers that they are speeding round the race track at Le Mans when, in fact, they are sitting in a simulator in the McLaren offices in Woking? Apparently it’s all about getting the vibrations right. Racing drivers really do drive by the seat of their pants. They’re also highly attuned to the sound f the engine and instinctively associate different sounds with different speeds. When Caroline Hargrove started trying to build a driveable model of a Formula One car many thought it just wouldn’t be possible. Today, all the major manufacturers of Formula One [...]

Mike Stratton and cancer genes (32 days old [13/11/18])

audioWhen Michael Stratton was a young doctor he would diagnose cancer by studying tissue samples under a microscope. However, over the past 30 years he’s been advancing our understanding of this disease down at the level of the genes themselves, so that we are now able to read the DNA of a cancer. This had led to new diagnoses and treatments. Mike Stratton’s first foray into genetics culminated in the discovery of the BRCA 2, one of the main genes involved in hereditary breast cancer. Following this painstaking detective work he and the Institute for Cancer Research became embroiled in a patent [...]

Detective of the mind Dr Suzanne O'Sullivan (39 days old [06/11/18])

audioSuzanne O'Sullivan has been described as “a detective of the mind”. She’s a neurologist who helps some patients with the strangest of symptoms, from so-called ‘Alice in Wonderland’ seizures to those suffering from temporary blindness or paralysis, and that turn out to originate in their subconscious minds. By the time these people get to see Dr Suzanne O’Sullivan they’ll often have been to many specialists, undergone a range of tests and given a variety of diagnoses. Suzanne’s an expert on epilepsy, and the unusual ways that seizures can manifest themselves, who currently works at University C[...]

Noel Fitzpatrick on becoming a supervet (46 days old [30/10/18])

audioFor all his success as a Supervet on TV and as a pioneering orthopedic surgeon, Noel Fitzpatrick insists that his life has been full of failures. He didn’t enjoy studying for his specialist vet exams and spent ten years working as an actor before setting up his veterinary practice, Fitzpatrick Referrals. Determined to offer animals access to medical treatments and facilities that are more commonly reserved for humans, he has pioneered several new surgical procedures for small animals, specialising in spinal injuries and creating bionic limbs. The prosthetic leg he made for a German shepherd d[...]

Jacqueline McGlade on monitoring the environment from space (53 days old [23/10/18])

audioAn ecologist who fell in love with computing, Jacqueline McGlade pioneered the use of satellites study the state of the global environment. Today thanks to programmes like Google Earth, we can see the surface of the earth in great detail. But when Jacqueline was a student, earth observation satellites were used for weather forecasting and not much else. Early in her career, she used satellite images to study fish populations, thinking it would be useful to know not only how many fish were in the sea but where they were likely to be. Few believed such an ambitious undertaking would be possible [...]

Rachel Mills exploring the sea floor (179 days old [19/06/18])

audioProfessor Rachel Mills is a marine geochemist who studies the sea floor and hydrothermal vents, where water erupts from the earth's crust at 360 degrees. The thick plumes emit many metals such as copper, gold, iron and rare earth minerals that are deposited on the sea bed. Rachel's career has taken her all over the world and 4km deep under the ocean in small submersibles. These journeys are exciting and terrifying as samples are taken to understand how the metals travel many thousands of miles. The metals are involved in creating nutrients that supply the ocean's food chain and control carbon [...]

Frank Close and particle physics (186 days old [12/06/18])

audioFrank Close is a theoretical particle physicist and a pioneer of popular writing about physics. His first book aimed at a non-specialist audience, The Cosmic Onion, was published 35 years ago. His latest, Half Life, is the story of physicist and spy, Bruno Pontecorvo. Frank has also had a distinguished research career studying the fundamental structure of matter. It was during his PhD in the late 60s that quarks were discovered. These are the fundamental entities we now know make up particles such as protons and neutrons, which in turn make up the nuclei of atoms, and therefore all of us and e[...]

(C) BBC 2018

Ipswich