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Podcasts



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One to One

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to Dr Sohom Das (6 days old [16/04/19])

audioFormer Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger meets Dr Sohom Das, a consultant forensic psychiatrist. His job is to assess, treat and rehabilitate mentally ill offenders. Dr Sohom discusses the effect that a life behind bars has upon the mind, tells Alan about the times when he has made a difference, and talks about the challenges of treating mentally ill offenders inside jail. Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to CJ Burge (13 days old [09/04/19])

audioIn her early twenties, CJ Burge was sentenced to nine and a half years in prison for importing drugs into Japan. She went on to spend six years in jail, first in Japan and then in the UK. Today, with a first class Law degree earned through study in prison, she is a different person. CJ talks to Alan Rusbridger about life in prison in two different countries and reveals the effect that imprisonment had on her mental state. She tells him about being grateful for incarceration and about how she used opportunities in jail to change her life beyond the prison walls. Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to Jonathan Aitken (20 days old [02/04/19])

audioIn 1999, Jonathan Aitken was sentenced to 18 months for perjury and perverting the course of justice. He went on to spend seven months behind bars, in three different prisons. At the time, Alan Rusbridger was his adversary. Then editor of The Guardian newspaper, Alan had reported Jonathan to the police for perjury after a high profile libel trial. Twenty years on, Alan sits down with Jonathan, now a chaplain at Pentonville Prison, to find out what he learned from life behind bars, how the experience of incarceration changed the way he thought, and how it continues to shape his life today. P[...]

Mourning – traditions in Hinduism (27 days old [26/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson meets Dr Girdari Bhan who is actively involved in the Interfaith Network for the UK and past President of the World Hindu Council UK, to hear about the structured approach to death and mourning practised in Hinduism. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a traditional way of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Bunt

Mourning – traditions in Judaism (34 days old [19/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson meets Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis to hear about the structured approach to mourning offered in Judaism which aims to guide the mourners through their loss and ease them back into the world beyond grief. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a tradition of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Blunt

Mourning - Nine Nights (41 days old [12/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson explores how we navigate grief with fellow Jamaican Maaureesha Shaw as they discuss the tradition of Nine Nights - the period that is spent in mourning prior to the funeral. Do rituals help? What can we learn from the rituals and traditions of other cultures and beliefs? Producer Sarah Bunt

Rachel Johnson talks to Absent Mothers: Sarah (48 days old [05/03/19])

audioRachel Johnson is fascinated how mothers are often judged more harshly for their parenting choices than men. She meets Sarah, who chose to live away from her two children for some months in order to deal with her drug-taking. This is something Rachel knows something about as her own mother left the family home during an episode of mental illness when she was a child. Rachel explores the effect of this separation on both the children and the mother. Produced in Bristol by Sara Conkey

Working Too Hard? Busy and important (62 days old [19/02/19])

audioThe New Statesman's Helen Lewis meets Brigid Schulte from the Better Life Lab, and author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time". Brigid argues that we confuse being busy with being important, and that a lot of our so-called work time is time wasted. So what's the alternative? Producer: Chris Ledgard

Working Too Hard? The Gig Economy (69 days old [12/02/19])

audioHelen Lewis, associate editor of the New Statesman, meets Deliveroo and Uber Eats rider, Aaron Tatlow. What's it like to work for an app on your phone, when your boss is an algorithm? Some customers are very friendly, Aaron says - one man just lowers a basket for the food from his second floor window. And what about the dangers of the job, and the physical demands? Last year, Aaron cycled more than 10,000 miles delivering food to customers in York. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Working too hard? The four-day week (76 days old [05/02/19])

audioHelen Lewis meets the distinguished economist Robert Skidelsky, who's been asked by the Shadow Chancellor to lead an inquiry into a four-day working week. Lord Skidelsky is a biographer of John Maynard Keynes, who predicted we'd be working 15 hours a week by 2030. So what has happened to the Keynesian dream? And, as he approaches his 80th birthday, why is Lord Skidelsky still working so hard? Producer: Chris Ledgard

(C) BBC 2019

One to One

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to Dr Sohom Das (6 days old [16/04/19])

audioFormer Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger meets Dr Sohom Das, a consultant forensic psychiatrist. His job is to assess, treat and rehabilitate mentally ill offenders. Dr Sohom discusses the effect that a life behind bars has upon the mind, tells Alan about the times when he has made a difference, and talks about the challenges of treating mentally ill offenders inside jail. Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to CJ Burge (13 days old [09/04/19])

audioIn her early twenties, CJ Burge was sentenced to nine and a half years in prison for importing drugs into Japan. She went on to spend six years in jail, first in Japan and then in the UK. Today, with a first class Law degree earned through study in prison, she is a different person. CJ talks to Alan Rusbridger about life in prison in two different countries and reveals the effect that imprisonment had on her mental state. She tells him about being grateful for incarceration and about how she used opportunities in jail to change her life beyond the prison walls. Producer: Camellia Sinclair

Life in prison: Alan Rusbridger talks to Jonathan Aitken (20 days old [02/04/19])

audioIn 1999, Jonathan Aitken was sentenced to 18 months for perjury and perverting the course of justice. He went on to spend seven months behind bars, in three different prisons. At the time, Alan Rusbridger was his adversary. Then editor of The Guardian newspaper, Alan had reported Jonathan to the police for perjury after a high profile libel trial. Twenty years on, Alan sits down with Jonathan, now a chaplain at Pentonville Prison, to find out what he learned from life behind bars, how the experience of incarceration changed the way he thought, and how it continues to shape his life today. P[...]

Mourning – traditions in Hinduism (27 days old [26/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson meets Dr Girdari Bhan who is actively involved in the Interfaith Network for the UK and past President of the World Hindu Council UK, to hear about the structured approach to death and mourning practised in Hinduism. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a traditional way of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Bunt

Mourning – traditions in Judaism (34 days old [19/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson meets Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis to hear about the structured approach to mourning offered in Judaism which aims to guide the mourners through their loss and ease them back into the world beyond grief. Having a Jamaican heritage, and a tradition of mourning called Nine Nights, Euella is keen to find out what we can learn from other cultures and faiths to help us through the grieving process. Producer Sarah Blunt

Mourning - Nine Nights (41 days old [12/03/19])

audioEuella Jackson explores how we navigate grief with fellow Jamaican Maaureesha Shaw as they discuss the tradition of Nine Nights - the period that is spent in mourning prior to the funeral. Do rituals help? What can we learn from the rituals and traditions of other cultures and beliefs? Producer Sarah Bunt

Rachel Johnson talks to Absent Mothers: Sarah (48 days old [05/03/19])

audioRachel Johnson is fascinated how mothers are often judged more harshly for their parenting choices than men. She meets Sarah, who chose to live away from her two children for some months in order to deal with her drug-taking. This is something Rachel knows something about as her own mother left the family home during an episode of mental illness when she was a child. Rachel explores the effect of this separation on both the children and the mother. Produced in Bristol by Sara Conkey

Working Too Hard? Busy and important (62 days old [19/02/19])

audioThe New Statesman's Helen Lewis meets Brigid Schulte from the Better Life Lab, and author of "Overwhelmed: How to Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time". Brigid argues that we confuse being busy with being important, and that a lot of our so-called work time is time wasted. So what's the alternative? Producer: Chris Ledgard

Working Too Hard? The Gig Economy (69 days old [12/02/19])

audioHelen Lewis, associate editor of the New Statesman, meets Deliveroo and Uber Eats rider, Aaron Tatlow. What's it like to work for an app on your phone, when your boss is an algorithm? Some customers are very friendly, Aaron says - one man just lowers a basket for the food from his second floor window. And what about the dangers of the job, and the physical demands? Last year, Aaron cycled more than 10,000 miles delivering food to customers in York. Producer: Chris Ledgard

Working too hard? The four-day week (76 days old [05/02/19])

audioHelen Lewis meets the distinguished economist Robert Skidelsky, who's been asked by the Shadow Chancellor to lead an inquiry into a four-day working week. Lord Skidelsky is a biographer of John Maynard Keynes, who predicted we'd be working 15 hours a week by 2030. So what has happened to the Keynesian dream? And, as he approaches his 80th birthday, why is Lord Skidelsky still working so hard? Producer: Chris Ledgard

(C) BBC 2019

The Life Scientific

Erica McAlister on the beauty of flies (6 days old [16/04/19])

audioDr Erica McAlister, of London's Natural History Museum, talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the beautiful world of flies and the 2.5 million specimens for which she is jointly responsible. According to Erica, a world without flies would be full of faeces and dead bodies. Unlike, for example, butterflies and moths, whose caterpillars spend their time devouring our crops and plants, fly larvae tend to help rid the world of waste materials and then, as adults, perform essential work as pollinators. Yet they are rather unloved by humans who tend to regard them as pests at best and disease vectors at [...]

Richard Peto on why smoking kills but quitting saves lives (13 days old [09/04/19])

audioWhen Sir Richard Peto began work with the late Richard Doll fifty years ago, the UK had the worst death rates from smoking in the world. Smoking was the cause of more than half of all premature deaths of British men. The fact that this country now boasts the biggest decrease in tobacco-linked mortality is in no doubt partly due to Doll and Peto's thirty year collaboration. Professor of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology at the University of Oxford and until last year co-director of the Clinical Trial Service Unit with Professor Sir Rory Collins, Richard Peto pioneered "big data", setting up e[...]

Irene Tracey on pain in the brain (20 days old [02/04/19])

audioPain, as we know, is highly personal. Some can cope with huge amounts, while others reel in agony over a seemingly minor injury. Though you might feel the stab of pain in your stubbed toe or sprained ankle, it is actually processed in the brain. That is where Irene Tracey, Nuffield Professor of Anaesthetic Science at Oxford University, has been focussing her attention. Known as the Queen of Pain, she has spent the past two decades unravelling the complexities of this puzzling sensation. She goes behind the scenes, as it were, of what happens when we feel pain - scanning the brains of her [...]

Paul Davies on the origin of life and the evolution of cancer (27 days old [26/03/19])

audioPhysicist, Paul Davies is interested in some of the biggest questions that we can ask. What is life? How did the universe begin? How will it end? And are we alone? His research has been broad and far-reaching, covering quantum mechanics, cosmology and black holes. In the 1980s he described the so-called Bunch-Davies vacuum - the quantum vacuum that existed just fractions of a second after the big bang - when particles were popping in and out of existence and nothing was stable. As the chair of SETI (the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) Post Detection Task Group, he’s the person [...]

Corinne Le Quéré on the global carbon cycle (34 days old [19/03/19])

audioThroughout the history of planet Earth, the element carbon has cycled between the atmosphere, the oceans and the biosphere. This natural cycle has maintained the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and has allowed life to exist for billions of years. Corinne Le Quéré is a climate scientist who keeps track of where the carbon comes from and where it goes – all on a truly global scale. Corinne Le Quéré is the founder of the Global Carbon Budget, which each year reports on where carbon dioxide is being emitted and where it is being absorbed around the world. More specifically, she studie[...]

Ken Gabriel, Why your Smartphone is Smart. (40 days old [13/03/19])

audioHow insight with a stick and piece of string led to an engineering adventure taking in spacecraft, military guidance systems and the micro-mechanical devices we use every day in our computers and smartphones. Ken Gabriel now heads up a large non-profit engineering company, Draper, which cut its teeth building the guidance systems for the Apollo space missions, and is now involved in developing both driverless cars and drug production systems for personalised medicine. Ken himself has a career in what he might term ‘disruptive engineering’. His research married digital electronics with acoust[...]

2018 Nobel Prize winner, Donna Strickland, on laser physics (48 days old [05/03/19])

audioWhen the first laser was built in 1960, it was an invention looking for an application. Science fiction found uses for these phenomenally powerful beams of light long before real world applications were developed. Think Star Wars light sabres and people being sliced in half. Today lasers are used for everything from hair removal to state of the art weapons. Working with her supervisor Gerard Mourou in the 1980s, the Canadian physicist, Donna Strickland found a way to make laser pulses that were thousands of times more powerful than anything that had been made before. These rapid bursts of inte[...]

Gwen Adshead on treating the minds of violent offenders (55 days old [26/02/19])

audioWhether it’s a news story or television drama, human violence appals and fascinates in equal measure. Yet few of us choose to dwell on what preoccupies the mind of a perpetrator for long. Professor Gwen Adshead, however, thinks about little else. As a Forensic Psychotherapist, she works with some of the most vilified and rejected members of society. They are the violent offenders who are detained in prisons and in secure NHS hospitals, like Broadmoor, whose actions have been linked to their mental illness. Gwen has sought to understand the psychological mechanisms behind their violent b[...]

2018 Chemistry Nobel Prize winner, Sir Gregory Winter (62 days old [19/02/19])

audioIn an astonishing story of a scientific discovery, Greg Winter tells Jim Al-Khalili how decades of curiosity-driven research led to a revolution in medicine. Forced to temporarily abandon his work in the lab when a road rage incident left him with a paralysed right arm, Greg Winter spent several months looking at the structure of proteins. Looking at the stunning computer graphics made the pain in his arm go away. It also led him to a Nobel Prize winning idea: to ‘humanise’ mouse antibodies. A visit to an old lady in hospital made Greg determined to put his research to good use. He fought hard[...]

Sue Black on women in tech (69 days old [12/02/19])

audioSue Black left home and school when she was 16. Aged 25, she attended an access course to get the qualifications she needed to go to university to study computer science. It was a bit lonely being the only student in a mini- skirt surrounded by a sea of suits, but she came top of the class nonetheless. She signed up to do a PhD (not really knowing what a PhD was) and worked on the ripple effect in software. What happens when you change one bit of code? Does it mess up everything else? A lot of new software is created by building on and adapting existing programmes so these are important [...]

(C) BBC 2019

Ipswich