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Podcasts



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One to One

Grief: Ramita Navai and Richard Osman (8 hours old)

audioAs a journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict in countries that can be tricky to operate in, Ramita Navai is good at compartmentalising the trauma she's seen and feels mentally resilient. But when her own father died three years ago, she was - and still is - overwhelmed by the grief. She talks to bestselling author and friend, Richard Osman about his experience of grieving for his estranged father compared with her own. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio.

Grief: Ramita Navai and Mary-Frances O’Connor (8 hours old)

audioRamita Navai is a foreign affairs journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict around the world. She has reported from war zones and hostile territories in over forty countries, and although good at compartmentalising the trauma she's witnessed, nothing could prepare her for the grief she felt when her own father died three years ago. In this episode, she speaks to Mary-Frances O’Connor, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, who runs the grief, loss and social stress (Glass) lab, which explores the effects of grief on the brain and the body. Together, they talk [...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Sarah Crompton (6 days old [31/01/23])

audioWhat's it really like wielding the little notebook of doom or glory? Sarah Crompton, theatre critic for What's On Stage and dance critic for The Observer, tells all to broadcaster Luke Jones, who once dipped his toe into that world himself. They talk warm white wine, the imagined audience, vomiting and the most unforgiveable critical gaffe of all. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Reece Parkinson and Lucy Chambers (111 days old [18/10/22])

audioBBC Radio 1Xtra's Reece Parkinson meets Dr Lucy Chambers from Diabetes UK to discuss type 1 diabetes, swap stories about travel, and talk about the future for diabetes treatment. Producer: Melanie Pearson

Reece Parkinson and Melanie Stephenson-Gray (118 days old [11/10/22])

audioBBC Radio 1Xtra DJ and long distance runner Reece Parkinson meets Welsh athlete Melanie Stephenson-Gray to talk about type 1 diabetes and how it impacts their lives and love of sport. Producer: Melanie Pearson

Gospel and social change: Gillian Burke and Karen Gibson (139 days old [20/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this third programme Gillian speaks to the conductor of The Kingdom Choir, Karen Gibson. Karen grew up singing in church and Gospel groups, before graduating to the role of choir conductor on a BBC radio programme called The Gospel Train. She was asked to perform on the 35th anniversary of 'Songs of Praise', and The Kingdom Choir was born. In 2018 they stepped onto the [...]

Gospel in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Richard Penrose (146 days old [13/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this second programme Gillian delves deeper into the mechanics of gospel music and asks Musical Director Richard Penrose exactly what makes a Gospel song. They discuss Richard's own route into Gospel music which began when he was a teenager in his home town of Porthleven. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field

Gospel music in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Ley Adewole (153 days old [06/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. Ley Adewole is the Director of the Falmouth Community Gospel Choir. Ley began singing in a Pentecostal church in Coventry; she joined various singing groups, got spotted and went on to do session work. She relocated to Falmouth and set-up a gospel music workshop to fill-in the winter months. The choir was born, welcoming in people of all faiths, and even those who can and[...]

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (223 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (230 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

(C) BBC 2023

One to One

Grief: Ramita Navai and Richard Osman (8 hours old)

audioAs a journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict in countries that can be tricky to operate in, Ramita Navai is good at compartmentalising the trauma she's seen and feels mentally resilient. But when her own father died three years ago, she was - and still is - overwhelmed by the grief. She talks to bestselling author and friend, Richard Osman about his experience of grieving for his estranged father compared with her own. Produced by Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio.

Grief: Ramita Navai and Mary-Frances O’Connor (8 hours old)

audioRamita Navai is a foreign affairs journalist who investigates human rights abuses and conflict around the world. She has reported from war zones and hostile territories in over forty countries, and although good at compartmentalising the trauma she's witnessed, nothing could prepare her for the grief she felt when her own father died three years ago. In this episode, she speaks to Mary-Frances O’Connor, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, who runs the grief, loss and social stress (Glass) lab, which explores the effects of grief on the brain and the body. Together, they talk [...]

Critics and the Criticised: Luke Jones meets Sarah Crompton (6 days old [31/01/23])

audioWhat's it really like wielding the little notebook of doom or glory? Sarah Crompton, theatre critic for What's On Stage and dance critic for The Observer, tells all to broadcaster Luke Jones, who once dipped his toe into that world himself. They talk warm white wine, the imagined audience, vomiting and the most unforgiveable critical gaffe of all. Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

Reece Parkinson and Lucy Chambers (111 days old [18/10/22])

audioBBC Radio 1Xtra's Reece Parkinson meets Dr Lucy Chambers from Diabetes UK to discuss type 1 diabetes, swap stories about travel, and talk about the future for diabetes treatment. Producer: Melanie Pearson

Reece Parkinson and Melanie Stephenson-Gray (118 days old [11/10/22])

audioBBC Radio 1Xtra DJ and long distance runner Reece Parkinson meets Welsh athlete Melanie Stephenson-Gray to talk about type 1 diabetes and how it impacts their lives and love of sport. Producer: Melanie Pearson

Gospel and social change: Gillian Burke and Karen Gibson (139 days old [20/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this third programme Gillian speaks to the conductor of The Kingdom Choir, Karen Gibson. Karen grew up singing in church and Gospel groups, before graduating to the role of choir conductor on a BBC radio programme called The Gospel Train. She was asked to perform on the 35th anniversary of 'Songs of Praise', and The Kingdom Choir was born. In 2018 they stepped onto the [...]

Gospel in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Richard Penrose (146 days old [13/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. In this second programme Gillian delves deeper into the mechanics of gospel music and asks Musical Director Richard Penrose exactly what makes a Gospel song. They discuss Richard's own route into Gospel music which began when he was a teenager in his home town of Porthleven. Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Toby Field

Gospel music in Cornwall: Gillian Burke and Ley Adewole (153 days old [06/09/22])

audioIn 2014 the biologist and presenter Gillian Burke joined a community choir in Falmouth in a bid to strengthen her voice. Singing is Gillian's passion and it's her way of switching off from work and the pressures of life. Ley Adewole is the Director of the Falmouth Community Gospel Choir. Ley began singing in a Pentecostal church in Coventry; she joined various singing groups, got spotted and went on to do session work. She relocated to Falmouth and set-up a gospel music workshop to fill-in the winter months. The choir was born, welcoming in people of all faiths, and even those who can and[...]

Emma Garland and Kiri Pritchard-McLean on living in Wales (223 days old [28/06/22])

audioEmma Garland lives in London but was born in Wales. Welsh stand up queen Kiri Pritchard-McLean has returned to her roots in Anglesey and she explores hiraeth in her latest tour ... hiraeth being Welsh for a sense of longing for your home. So what is this draw both of them clearly feel, and can you be Welsh if you don't speak Welsh? Emma Garland was born in the valleys of South Wales and writes about culture for numerous magazines. Kiri Pritchard-McLean's latest show is called Home Truths. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

Emma Garland and Mike Parker on living in Wales (230 days old [21/06/22])

audioEmma and Mike have done a kind of cultural house swap - Emma left South Wales when she was 18 and is now London-based. Mike left England over two decades ago and has learnt to speak Welsh. So which of them is more Welsh? Emma Garland was born in Ynysybwl. She writes for Dazed, Vice and Rolling Stone magazine. Mike Parker lives in Powys and is the author of Neighbours from Hell and the forthcoming All the Wide Border, which is about the frontier between England and Wales. The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde

(C) BBC 2023

The Life Scientific

Clifford Johnson on making sense of black holes and movie plots (6 days old [31/01/23])

audioClifford Johnson's career to date has spanned some seemingly very different industries - from exploring quantum mechanics around string theory and black holes, to consulting on some of Hollywood's biggest movies; but it makes sense once you understand his ambition of making science accessible to all. A Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Clifford's worked in the United States for decades – but was born in the UK, then spent his formative years on the Caribbean island of Montserrat, before moving back to England to study[...]

Rebecca Kilner on beetle behaviours and evolution (13 days old [24/01/23])

audioA fur-stripped mouse carcase might not sound like the cosiest of homes – but that’s where the burying beetle makes its nest; and where Rebecca Kilner has focused much of her research. A Professor of Evolutionary Biology at the University of Cambridge, Rebecca’s work – initially with cuckoos, then more recently with the beetles – has shed invaluable light on the relationship between social behaviours and evolution. She tells Jim Al-Khalili how the beetles’ helpfully swift generational churn and mouse-based parenting has allowed her team to study evolution in action, demonstrating for the first [...]

Pam Shaw on the research battle against motor neurone disease (20 days old [17/01/23])

audioMotor Neuron Disease (MND) is a degenerative disease that relentlessly attacks the human nervous system, deteriorating muscle function to the point where patients can no longer move, talk, eat, or even breathe. To date there’s no cure, and until fairly recently there were only minimal treatments to ease the symptoms. Pam Shaw has dedicated her career to changing that. A Professor of Neurology at Sheffield University and Founding Director of the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience, she recently led clinical trials into a drug that delivered unprecedented results: showing tha[...]

Chris Elliott on fighting food fraud (27 days old [10/01/23])

audioProfessor Chris Elliott is something of a ‘food detective’. A Professor of Food Safety and Microbiology at Queen's University Belfast and a founding director of its Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS), his work is all about developing scientific solutions to protect us from contaminated food, be it accidental or criminal. Following the 2013 horse meat scandal – when prepared foods purporting to be made from beef were found to contain undeclared horse-meat – Chris conducted the independent review of the UK food system that brought to light the growing threat of food crime. Since then, hi[...]

A passion for fruit flies (111 days old [18/10/22])

audioWhat use to science is a pesky organism that feeds on rotting fruit? Professor Bambos Kyriacou has spent fifty years observing the behaviour of fruit flies. He keeps them in the lab and in his garden in their thousands, has recorded fruit fly courtship songs using a microphone loved by Jonny Carson (because it made his voice sound deeper) and invented equipment to keep track of their sleeping patterns. He tells Jim Al-Khalili how fruit flies sparked his interest in genetics and how experiments with insomniac fruit flies opened our eyes to the fundamental importance of body clocks.

Why study sewage? (118 days old [11/10/22])

audioLeon Barron monitors pollution in our rivers, keeping tabs on chemicals that could be harmful to the environment and to our health. He’s also gathered intelligence on the behaviour of millions of Londoners by studying the water we flush down the loo. His analysis of sewage revealed, for example, just how much cocaine is consumed in London every day. And he’s helped the Metropolitan Police to crack crimes in other ways too, inventing new chemistry tools that can be used by forensic scientists to uncover clues. At school he had no idea he wanted to be an analytical chemist but a short work expe[...]

The sounds of coral reefs (125 days old [04/10/22])

audioTim Lamont is a young scientist making waves. Arriving on the Great Barrier Reef after a mass bleaching event, Tim saw his research plans disappear and was personally devastated by the destruction. But from that event he discovered a novel way to restore coral reefs. Playing the sounds of a healthy coral reef entices fish in to recolonise the wrecked reefs. Tim's emotional journey forced him to realise that environmental scientists can no longer just observe. They need to find new prisms with which to view the world and to intervene to save or protect the natural environment.

Can computers discover new medicines? (132 days old [27/09/22])

audioDaphne Koller was a precociously clever child. She completed her first degree – a double major in mathematics and computer science – when she was just 17 and went on to become a distinguished Professor at Stanford University in California. But before long she’d given up this comfortable academic position to create the biggest online education platform in the world. In 2018, she founded the drug discovery company Insitro hoping to create a space where data scientists and molecular biologists could work together as equals. Daphne tells Jim Al-Khalili how a single question from her supervisor[...]

Emily Holmes on how to treat trauma (139 days old [20/09/22])

audioEmily Holmes is a distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychology at Uppsala University and a neuroscientist who struggled to learn to read and write as a child. She tells Jim Al-Khalili about her work as a mental health scientist and her life-long love of art and explains why the images we see in our mind’s eye have more of an impact on our emotions than their verbal counterpart. And describes how this fundamental insight led her to develop a simple and cost-effective treatment for the fleeting flashbacks that haunt people with post traumatic stress disorder: briefly recalling the traumatic e[...]

Judith Bunbury on the shifting River Nile in the time of the Pharaohs (145 days old [14/09/22])

audioThink Sahara Desert, think intense heat and drought. We see the Sahara as an unrelenting, frazzling, white place. But geo-archaeologist Dr Judith Bunbury says in the not so distant past, the region looked more like a safari park. In the more recent New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, from around 3.5 thousand years ago (the time of some of Egypt’s most famous kings like Ahmose I, Thutmose III, Akhenaten, Tutankhamun and queens like Hatshepsut) evidence from core samples shows evidence of rainfall, huge lakes, springs, trees, birds, hares and even gazelle, very different from today. By combining geo[...]

(C) BBC 2023

Ipswich